The Saddlers Company of Newcastle upon Tyne

A saddle is a supportive structure for a rider or other load, fastened to an animal's back by a girth. The most common type is the equestrian saddle designed for a horse, but specialized saddles have been created for camels and other creatures. The earliest saddles were simple pads attached with a surcingle seen by 800 BC, with the saddle tree coming into use circa 200 BC, and paired stirrups by 322 A.D. Saddles in the styles seen today date back to the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, modern saddle comes in a wide variety of styles, each designed for a specific equestrian discipline, and require careful fit to both the rider and the horse. Proper saddle care can extend the useful life of a saddle, often for decades.

From: 'Wikipedia: Saddle'

Saddlers in Newcastle

The oldest ordinary of this society, is dated March 6th 1459. It enjoins them to go in procession, in a livery, at the feast of Corpus Christi, and perform their play at their own cost; and that each brother should be at the procession when his hour was assigned, under pain of forty-pence. That no Scotsman born should be taken apprentice, or suffered to work within the town, under a penalty of 20s.

It further ordered, that no apprentice should be taken under a term of seven years, on pain of 6s. 8d.; enjoying civil behaviour to each other at their meetings, the observation of holidays, &c. Another record of the society is dated February 4th 1532.

In November 22nd 1694, bought a silver tankard; to be lent to brothers at marriages, christenings, and funerals.

In 1708, No brother shall take an apprentice till his former apprentice has served 6 years of his term of 9 years. Apprentices that married, or 'happened to get an illegitimate child' were find 5.